Morris Traveller Restoration Newbie

Let us all know what you are up to with your current restoration project. Get that Minor on the road!

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MagicMorris
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Re: Morris Traveller Restoration Newbie

Postby MagicMorris » Fri Jul 28, 2017 9:59 am

Is this the sort of thing you mean
http://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/Morris-Minor- ... 2548.l4275

Quite expensive but if it includes every nut, bolt and grommet it may be worth it

BrianHawley
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Re: Morris Traveller Restoration Newbie

Postby BrianHawley » Fri Jul 28, 2017 12:19 pm

MagicMorris wrote:Is this the sort of thing you mean
http://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/Morris-Minor- ... 2548.l4275

Quite expensive but if it includes every nut, bolt and grommet it may be worth it
No reviews I notice.

May be a new item, or possibly they took down and re-listed a previous offer for some reason.
Brian

Image "Jodie". '67 Traveller, 1275, discs, suspension mods etc.

mogbob
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Re: Morris Traveller Restoration Newbie

Postby mogbob » Fri Jul 28, 2017 4:56 pm

I'm a bit late contributing , been away on hols.
If you attack the underseal and rusting paintwork with a wire brush on your angle grinder , you soon find it "clogging up " very quickly !
Use a heat gun to " soften " up the underseal ( over heating will result in a mini fire ). Scrape off with an old wallpaper scraper, putty knife or old chisel. Tear up sheets of old newspaper , to wipe the blade clean of gunge /paint / rust and have a black sack / waste bin handy.
Once the worse has been removed , old rag with a splash of white spirit and a wipe over the area , will let you see the wood for the trees.
Make sure the hot air gun has cooled down and been put safely away beforehand.
You will then have options , use paint stripper to get back to bare metal everywhere ( if you are not going down the professional dipping / stripping service route ). Or just strip the paint around the rusty areas , to get back to / find clean solid metal to weld to.
This is the point where the wire brush will come in handy. I became a great fan of the power file for cleaning up the bodywork because it can reach pretty inaccessible ( for a wire brush wheel ) areas.

If used at the start :- underseal / paint / rust flakes / loose metal will be flying around everywhere causing physical damage to you and any bystanders and creating one hell of mess for a large area around you ( depending on the size and power of your angle grinder ).

Certainly a nice clean surface will enable you to come to a rational / considered decision over what panels to completely replace and what to repair / patch. Good ready made panels provide , at a cost , the correct solution and don't require any fabrication. They may still need and element of tweaking to fit properly but they speed up the whole process.
If cash is an issue but you have plenty of time on your hands and an element of fabrication skills , then certainly making the simpler panels yourself is an option. Complicated repair sections are always worth purchasing from the usual suppliers.

Half the fun in restoring old classic cars is deciding how far you want to go , doing it yourself ? Only you can answer that question and therefore only you can ever have the correct answer.
Good luck with it and enjoy.
Bob

BrianHawley
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Re: Morris Traveller Restoration Newbie

Postby BrianHawley » Sat Jul 29, 2017 5:50 am

You might want to think about a rollover rig.

Lying on your back using heat guns and paint stripper on old under seal that's above you isn't as much fun as you may think.

Some roll the car onto tyres, but that's more risky if you mess it up.
Brian

Image "Jodie". '67 Traveller, 1275, discs, suspension mods etc.

MagicMorris
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Re: Morris Traveller Restoration Newbie

Postby MagicMorris » Sat Jul 29, 2017 8:44 am

Thanks for all the information, I guess things become more clear as you get stuck into the restoration.
Currently the car is fully stipped with just the woodwork remaining, the plan now is to make a spit and rotate the car to remove the underseal.
I have puchased a blasting pot from http://www.millarsodablasting.com/ which is going to be used to remove the paint from the engine bay, panels etc... The work will then begin to replace / repair panels with the plan being to start from the front, chassis leg, floor panels, sills around areas around the door etc... and then remove the woodwoork and continue backwards.

Is the best practice to blast the panels which I believe leaves a coating still on so rust doesnt occur, then when a panel is cleaned up and welded spray it with some etch primer?

MagicMorris
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Re: Morris Traveller Restoration Newbie

Postby MagicMorris » Mon Sep 18, 2017 10:13 pm

So most of the underseal has now been removed using a combination of heat gun / scraper and wire brush attachment on an angle grinder. I also couldn't resist on having a little play with the soda blaster on the engine bay!

What's great is that I can now see exactly the condition it is in! Unfortunately, this has only made everything look a little more daunting. I stared the project with the aim of attempting everything myself using the available information and advice from others who have gone through similar projects. Whilst I haven't attempted any welding as yet, I'm in the process of organising some tuition from a contact I've been given. I'm sure many hours practicing will then follow before feeling 1/2 confident in touching the car.

I've included below a link to some photos I've taken today that have been uploaded to a Dropbox album:
https://www.dropbox.com/sh/ckkbu4yzut8x ... IMsCa?dl=0

I'll also upload a select few directly here for those not wanting to view a Dropbox album.

Having looked at the damaged panels and the repair / spare panels available from ESM I believe the following are a selection of what will need replacing:

Full cross member
All floor panels
Both full rear arches
Full driver side chassis leg
Both A pillars
Front cross member
Rear apron
Spring hangers

This may seem like a silly question but where does one begin? Can any one offer any recommendations on what to do first?

Thanks in advance!
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firedrake1942
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Re: Morris Traveller Restoration Newbie

Postby firedrake1942 » Tue Sep 19, 2017 6:11 am

I have seen a lot worse than this on my car and on this forum, rescued to a high standard. None of this is any less than doable. As a start you need to get some bracing into the car to preserve shape / structure as doors etc have been removed. If you start cutting out floor or a / b posts / cross members the car can twist and deform and any repairs panels will be welded back in on the slant. keep the progress piccies coming.

greendefender123
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Re: Morris Traveller Restoration Newbie

Postby greendefender123 » Tue Sep 19, 2017 8:04 am

As above. When i started mine i fixed the rear arches, boot floor and rear chassis legs first. Then i moved onto the sills and the panels surrounding them a side at a time. I braced across the door pillars. You can also do the pillars at the same time. I repaired the floors and fitted a new crossmember end and repaired the other end.

I then repaired the inner wings. One side i replaced most of it. I also cut out rot and reinforced the bump stop area. Also fitted new hinge cover panels as well.

Then i moved onto the chassis legs and tie plates repairing where necessary. I also changed the spring hangers on the rear springs. You have to line these up well. I was relieved that i got the right.

Just start doing abit at a time and try not to remove to much at once, you'll soon get it strong. I used to do a panel a day but still got there in the end.
Image

GavinL
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Re: Morris Traveller Restoration Newbie

Postby GavinL » Tue Sep 19, 2017 9:38 am

A bit belated, but how did you get on with the soda blasting? I'm just starting on a similar project and was considering buying a soda blaster but don't have any experience of how easy to use, effective or messy they are.

MagicMorris
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Re: Morris Traveller Restoration Newbie

Postby MagicMorris » Tue Sep 19, 2017 9:48 am

Thanks guys. You make it sound all so easy :)

I've taken a screenshot of one of Neil's restoration pics as shown below. How has he removed the floor panel from the flange as per the lower arrow (if, and assuming this is not spot welded)?
weldforum.jpg
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MagicMorris
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Re: Morris Traveller Restoration Newbie

Postby MagicMorris » Tue Sep 19, 2017 9:55 am

GavinL wrote:A bit belated, but how did you get on with the soda blasting? I'm just starting on a similar project and was considering buying a soda blaster but don't have any experience of how easy to use, effective or messy they are.
Hi Gavin. The company we purchased it from have been great in helping us set it up correctly. It's probably a little slower than I expected (the engine bay took the best part of 2 hours) but the results are great. It's definitely a messy job and I recommend doing it over a large tarpaulin sheet so that you can reuse the media. I'll do a video the next time I use it and upload for viewing.

mogbob
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Re: Morris Traveller Restoration Newbie

Postby mogbob » Wed Sep 20, 2017 10:34 am

Removing the panels normally involves dealing with spot welds. You can buy a " spot weld drill bit ". If you can't see the weld spots clearly
a light rub down with rough sand paper /emery paper and a good light source will help you identify the tell tale dimple where the two bits of metal have been welded together. Mark the center of the dimple with a center punch , put the spot weld drill bit in your drill and away you go. You aiming to " just " break through the top panel , leaving the underside panel untouched.
With practice you'll get the knack. Don't panic , you can always "blip " a spot of weld on the hole in the underside panel , once the top
panel has been removed.
You can get around not have the special drill by using ordinary drills but it will take a bit longer. First drill the spot with a small drill , say 1/8 th inch and go right through both bits of metal , then take a bigger , wider drill to effectively countersink just the top panel.
Warning the weld area is hard ( think of drilling granite stone ) so you will get through a lot of drills when doing the whole car. The special drill bit will cope with an awful lot more , so what started as expensive , might be cheaper than a lot of ordinary drill bits ! Your decision.

Removing the rusted top panel , with the spot welds removed as best you can, it is a case of using a small cold chisel or an old wood chisel ( you don't mind knackering .. pound shop / autojumble / car boot sale ). Insert between the two layers and tap with your hammer. A Mole grip clamped on to the duff panel will help rip it away from the remaining panel. In your enthusiasm , try not to distort the panel that you are keeping. You sometimes need to support it , by clamping lump of metal / wood block so that you have something solid to lever against. Clean up the remnants on the lower panel with an angle grinder or powerfile. You will soon find your own rhythm / method of doing things efficiently with minimal damage.

A more brutal method is the break out the angle grinder and " kiss " each spot , trying not to " decimate " the panel underneath. The top panel will be scrap. For this method you need access i.e enough room to swing your angle grinder. Angle grinding in a confined space , with bits of molten metal flying around is not something you want to volunteer for.
This is a good point to mention H & S... eye protection , goggles or I prefer a full facemask personally and thick gloves certainly. A thick leather welders apron saved me a few times from providing an impromptu very quick Irish jig.
Flying molten metal hitting your bare skin does totally concentrate your mind on the dangers of lack of preparation. Head banging as you try to remove yourself from the car , dancing skills and an expanding vocabulary to describe pain are a few by products.
I'm winching as a I recall the moment , etched in my memory bank.
Bob

firedrake1942
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Re: Morris Traveller Restoration Newbie

Postby firedrake1942 » Wed Sep 20, 2017 12:35 pm

or even wincing ?

kevin s
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Re: Morris Traveller Restoration Newbie

Postby kevin s » Wed Sep 20, 2017 9:00 pm

my advice would be to use plenty of bracing and only do one side at a time, put the bracing on the inside face of the pillars so you can test fit the doors as you go. As a traveller you also really need the wood available to check the rear end all lines up and hasn't distorted over the years before it is all welded together.

mogbob
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Re: Morris Traveller Restoration Newbie

Postby mogbob » Thu Sep 21, 2017 7:41 am

"winching " should have been "wincing " firedrake1942 , apologies for the typo.
Bob

firedrake1942
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Re: Morris Traveller Restoration Newbie

Postby firedrake1942 » Thu Sep 21, 2017 7:55 am

Just wondered what you were winching ?

Sparticus
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Re: Morris Traveller Restoration Newbie

Postby Sparticus » Thu Sep 21, 2017 10:20 am

Good luck with it, it looks like quite a lot of work... I have been there! :lol:
Grant, 23, Morris Minor traveller - Saloon. Merlin traveller 90% finished!
DSN Classics



MagicMorris
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Re: Morris Traveller Restoration Newbie

Postby MagicMorris » Fri Sep 29, 2017 11:46 am

I am currently looking at new floor panels and was wondering what peoples thoughts are around whether to go for a 1/2 panel floor or 2 x 1/4 floors.
I will more than likely need at least one step sill which comes included in the 1/2 floor but can be bought seperate on the 1/4 floors, I have heard that the 1/2 floor is more difficult to fit and needs more fettling but my initial thoughts were this would be easier to fit as one panel.

Thanks

mogbob
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Re: Morris Traveller Restoration Newbie

Postby mogbob » Fri Sep 29, 2017 12:39 pm

I always opt for the " bigger repair panel " when available and when the wallet will stand the purchase !
It's much easier to cut down / out "surplus " material , rather than adding an extra patch of metal ( = equals more joins to be welded ).
Much as you plan and believe it will be good strong metal on the edge of the hole you're about to repair... the rust always goes further.
Buying a correct panel , unless it is a flat piece of metal that is required ,will save you hours of time fabricating from scratch.
BUT don't take that statement to mean you won't have any adjustment or tweaking to do , even with good panels !!

If you've cut out the bad metal of an area and "found " good clean metal to weld up to, then you can order the smallest panel you need.
If time permits. Study the suppliers website photos carefully and compare it with your car. Measure carefully from obvious reference points ( drilled holes , indentations , etc ) and get an idea if your " first guess " as to what is required is right. Err on the side of caution until you get your eye in for this guestimation .
Bob

MagicMorris
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Re: Morris Traveller Restoration Newbie

Postby MagicMorris » Fri Oct 06, 2017 11:55 am

So I decided to start repairing / replacing the panels on the rear of the car, initially the nearside inner wing area. This job was made alot harder due to the fact the nice spot welds which drill out quite easily had been covered by dodgy repair patches seam welded on top.
As the layers slowly got peeled back it was obvious the bump stop and surrounding area was in need of repair along with the rear apron and surrounding areas.
The rear apron appears to have some random bolts through it which im pretty sure aren't standard!!
Being new to all this the plan keeps changing as we discover how to work things for the best, the current plan now is to remove all the rear apron bolts from the underside and then drop the car back down the right way onto either axle stands or tyres then remove the whole back axle to begin cutting away the rear apron, rear inner wing etc... before replacing / repairing with new panels.
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Dodgy repair panels
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Bolts on the rear apron?
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Chassis rail in need of repair
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Missing dump stop
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Dodgy repair panels
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