Separating shell from chassis

Discuss Bodywork problems here.

Moderator: Moderators

Andymoor94
Newbie
Posts: 4
Joined: Sun Aug 11, 2019 7:01 pm
MMOC Member: No

Separating shell from chassis

Postby Andymoor94 » Tue Aug 13, 2019 12:37 pm

Title says it all really!

1963 4 door saloon, welding required on chassis and body. I reckon in my case it may be easier to actually separate the shell from the chassis. How would one go about doing this with a Morris?

Alternatively, if you believe there's an easier way to sort out the welding, how could I go about doing this?

Main issues:
- Holes in sills
- Voids in wings
- Open areas in inner wings
- Large gaps in floorpans
- Orifices in boot floor
(Yes, holes everywhere)
- Chassis legs looking worse for wear
- Central cross member rotting slightly too

Thanks in advance! Also, first post - Hi! :D

philthehill
Minor Maniac
Posts: 6668
Joined: Thu Jul 19, 2012 12:05 pm
MMOC Member: Yes

Re: Separating shell from chassis

Postby philthehill » Tue Aug 13, 2019 12:54 pm

The Morris Minor/1000 does not have a separate body/chassis - it has a monocoque construction body shell so you cannot separate the body from the chassis.

Only with the commercial versions of the Morris can a partial separation of the chassis and body be undertaken.

All you can do is work through the body repairs as you have listed above.

Be prepared for more work and replacement of additional body panels once you undertake the restoration.


Andymoor94
Newbie
Posts: 4
Joined: Sun Aug 11, 2019 7:01 pm
MMOC Member: No

Re: Separating shell from chassis

Postby Andymoor94 » Tue Aug 13, 2019 1:10 pm

philthehill wrote:
Tue Aug 13, 2019 12:54 pm
The Morris Minor/1000 does not have a separate body/chassis - it has a monocoque construction body shell so you cannot separate the body from the chassis.

Only with the commercial versions of the Morris can a partial separation of the chassis and body be undertaken.

All you can do is work through the body repairs as you have listed above.

Be prepared for more work and replacement of additional body panels once you undertake the restoration.
I guess that's a blessing and a curse to hear. At least I don't need to worry about putting them back together again? But that leaves the next question then:

How would you suggest I create a situation where I can access the rust freely? The beauty of the separated chassis idea was that I can tackle it all "with ease" (I guess!). I don't have a spit, nor trust my abilities to build one. I only have a rear driveway (With lots of space) to work on, but it's all gravel! How would you suggest to approach this?

philthehill
Minor Maniac
Posts: 6668
Joined: Thu Jul 19, 2012 12:05 pm
MMOC Member: Yes

Re: Separating shell from chassis

Postby philthehill » Tue Aug 13, 2019 2:23 pm

Firstly I would do a full assessment of the body work requirements.
Make a full list of the repair requirements.
Take plenty of photos for future reference and for inclusion in the cars history file. Continue taking photos during the restoration.
After determining the order of importance start on cutting out and replacing the body panels
But before doing any cutting and/or panel removal I would cross brace the door apertures (especially if you have to do the sills). I would also brace across the car at the 'B' & 'C' posts (rear of the door apertures).
I would advise that you only remove what you have to when replacing a body section. Removing too much metal can result in the body warping. Always measure twice and cut once.
There are plenty of good examples of Morris Minor 1000 restorations on this web site - just use the search facility or ask on here for guidance,
We are a friendly bunch and always ready to help a fellow Morris Minor owner.

Phil


ianmack
Minor Addict
Posts: 654
Joined: Sat Jul 05, 2014 7:02 pm
MMOC Member: Yes

Re: Separating shell from chassis

Postby ianmack » Tue Aug 13, 2019 3:58 pm

As you have a fair bit of welding to do it would really be best to turn the car over on its side, using a spit or a cradle. If you don’t fancy making one you can buy them and secondhand ones aren’t too dear.

Crawling underneath and welding upwards is pretty unpleasant, especially as molten metal inevitably responds to gravity. If you remove the engine and gearbox the car is a good bit easier to handle. As a last resort people have been known to roll cars on to tyres and mattresses.

Working outside on gravel will be better with some floor boards and preferably some weather protection, even if only plastic sheets.

See google image for various ways people have rolled cars for welding.

Andymoor94
Newbie
Posts: 4
Joined: Sun Aug 11, 2019 7:01 pm
MMOC Member: No

Re: Separating shell from chassis

Postby Andymoor94 » Tue Aug 13, 2019 4:50 pm

philthehill wrote:
Tue Aug 13, 2019 2:23 pm
Firstly I would do a full assessment of the body work requirements.
Make a full list of the repair requirements.
Take plenty of photos for future reference and for inclusion in the cars history file. Continue taking photos during the restoration.
After determining the order of importance start on cutting out and replacing the body panels
But before doing any cutting and/or panel removal I would cross brace the door apertures (especially if you have to do the sills). I would also brace across the car at the 'B' & 'C' posts (rear of the door apertures).
I would advise that you only remove what you have to when replacing a body section. Removing too much metal can result in the body warping. Always measure twice and cut once.
There are plenty of good examples of Morris Minor 1000 restorations on this web site - just use the search facility or ask on here for guidance,
We are a friendly bunch and always ready to help a fellow Morris Minor owner.

Phil
Some fantastic words of advice there, thank you. I am constantly looking at other people's restoration threads in hope of finding something that helps me!

I'm enrolling in a local college for 6 week night course in welding, but I've already got a cheap ARC and a gasless MIG to practice with, so hopefully, fingers crossed, I can pick it up quickly.

I'll definitely be posting progress too!

Andymoor94
Newbie
Posts: 4
Joined: Sun Aug 11, 2019 7:01 pm
MMOC Member: No

Re: Separating shell from chassis

Postby Andymoor94 » Tue Aug 13, 2019 4:52 pm

ianmack wrote:
Tue Aug 13, 2019 3:58 pm
As you have a fair bit of welding to do it would really be best to turn the car over on its side, using a spit or a cradle. If you don’t fancy making one you can buy them and secondhand ones aren’t too dear.

Crawling underneath and welding upwards is pretty unpleasant, especially as molten metal inevitably responds to gravity. If you remove the engine and gearbox the car is a good bit easier to handle. As a last resort people have been known to roll cars on to tyres and mattresses.

Working outside on gravel will be better with some floor boards and preferably some weather protection, even if only plastic sheets.

See google image for various ways people have rolled cars for welding.
I cringed seeing someone roll their Moggy onto some spare wheels :o I have no intention of going under the car for this, so I'll likely buy some tubing, bend it, and possible make my own hub-fixed rollover rig

Mark Wilson
Minor Addict
Posts: 776
Joined: Fri Aug 26, 2011 12:42 pm
MMOC Member: Yes

Re: Separating shell from chassis

Postby Mark Wilson » Wed Aug 14, 2019 10:55 pm

The method of rolling does depend to some extent on what you expect to be repairing. For example, the hub fixed jigs are fine if you can leave the front and rear axles in place, but no good if these will need to be removed, as they often will be. The jigs fixed to the bumper irons have similar limitations if you will be working on the front or rear inner wings, as the irons are welded to these.

I went for a very cheap rotisserie made from scaffold tube and builders trestles - you can see it in my recent thread in the restoration section "Eight year Traveller restoration" https://www.mmoc.org.uk/Messageboard/v ... 28&t=70591

The limitation on this method for you would be holding the shell in place once rotated - I used chains or straps to the low timber roof above, but you can't as you are working outside. I did use props for some stages, but you'd have to make sure these were very firmly fixed. Even without the weight of the engine, box, axles and suspension the rotating weight can give you quite a hefty clout!

Good luck with the project.

Mark


Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 3 guests